Sunday, 7 February 2016

Armenian News... A Topalian...Armenian soldier killed in Azeri firing


armradio.am

05 Feb 2016
Siranush Ghazanchyan

Tensions were high at the line of contact between the armed forces of
Nagorno Karabakh and Azerbaijan last night, the NKR Ministry of
Defense reported.

The rival used artillery weapons of different caliber as it fire more
than 1,500 shots in the direction of the Armenian positions.

Private of the NKR Defense Army Simon Chavrshyan was killed as a
result of firing from the Azerbaijani side. Probe into the details of
the incident is under way.

The NKR Defense Ministry offers its condolences to the families and
friends of the soldier. 



arka.am 
About one third of Armenia's population ready to emigrate 
abroad, survey finds
YEREVAN, February 5. About one third of Armenia's population
are ready to emigrate abroad if they had such a possibility, Aharon
Adibekyan, head of Sociometer polling center in Yerevan, said today.

Speaking at a news conference, he said a survey conducted by his
polling center in 2015 that embraced 3,300 households in all the
regions of the country shows that 31% of the citizens are potential
emigrants and about 75% of them are people aged from 19 to 50.

According to the findings of the survey, 19.3% said would leave for
another country if they had enough financial means, 7.9% said they
would like to leave but could  not because of age, and 3.9% were
ready to leave the country if they had interesting job offers.

The reasons behind this desire, according to Adibekyan, are low wages
or no wages, difficult social conditions and lack of hope for a secure
future.

According to him, much fewer people indicated a desire to be reunited
with a family  abroad, to continue education abroad or hostility to
the country's leadership. Low salary as a reason to leave the country
was mentioned by 33.9% of respondents, 8.1% mentioned hard social
situation, 6.5% mentioned low pensions and 4.4% problems with the
payment for medical treatment.

Officially Armenia's permanent population as of January 1, 2016 was
less than 3 million, for the first time since 1970s, standing at
2.998.6 million, according to the National Statistical Service (NSS).
The year-on-year contraction was 12,000 people, it said.


lragir.am
Unemployment's Up By 16.9% in Armenia
30 January 2016, 18:32


The number of job seekers and the unemployment rate went up in 2015.
According to the National Statistics Service, as of December 2015,
88,928 were seeking jobs, of which 77,000 were unemployed.

As of the end of 2015, the unemployment rate is up by 16.9%.

The majority of registered unemployed, 53,069, are female.

The highest rate of registered unemployed people was in Yerevan
followed by Shirak and Lori regions. The majority of the unemployed
people are aged 35-44. The majority of the unemployed have secondary
education.

In 2015, 974 people found jobs, which is down by 28.6% compared 
with 2014. 


arka,am
Armenian central bank steps in to prevent depreciation of 
national currency

YEREVAN, February. An Armenian daily `Haykakan Zhamanak'
(Armenian Time) says in an apparent effort to prevent a renewed
depreciation of the national currency, the dram, the Central Bank of
Armenia (CBA)  injected on February 4 over $29 million in the local
currency market.

According to the newspaper, this was the first and `impressive'
currency intervention, made by the Central Bank recently.

"This means a rising demand for hard currency, which may lead to a
significant depreciation of the dram. However, given that the demand
did not cause panic among the population, one can say that the
situation will be controlled by the Central Bank for a long time," the
newspaper says.

The average market exchange rate of US dollar against the dram on
February 4 rose by 0.63 points to 492.41 drams. On Feb. 3 the dollar's
rate rose above 490 drams for the first time after a sharp devaluation
of the Armenian dram in late 2014. Armenian dram thus depreciated by
1.5% since the beginning of 2016. 


armenpress.am 
Book about massacres of Dersim-Armenians published in Turkey
5 February, 2016


YEREVAN, FEBRUARY 5.  Historian, writer, social scientist
Kazım GündoÄ?an's book entitled `Grandchildren of the Priest: Dersim
Armenians-1' was published in Turkey, the presentation of which took
place recently.

`Armenpress' reports, citing Turkish `Evrensel' newspaper, the book is
about the Armenian massacres that took place in Turkey in 1895 and the
Armenian Genocide of 1915. The book illustrates the attempts to
eliminate the Armenian estates, language, religion and culture of
Dersim-Armenians and their deportation from Motherland.

It is mentioned that during the Armenian Genocide a great number of
Dersim-Armenians were forced to abandon their religion, estates and
social position in order to survive.

This is not the first book Kazım GündoÄ?an writes about Armenians. He
also authored a documentary film about the issue.


keghart.com
Diffuse Opposition Sarkissian's Best Weapon
Editorial, 31 January 2016


`Within the Armenian Revolutionary Federation, we have been unable to
shape a culture of free thought, debate, and self-criticism that leads
to renewal...we have been unable to present the essence of the
ARF--its democratic nature, goals, operational style--in a simple
accessible way to a large segment of our people, including the
independence generation, and to draw strength from them as an
organization.'

The above quote is from a speech by Aghvan Vardanyan, ARF
parliamentary faction secretary, delivered following the party's 125th
anniversary celebrations in Yerevan on Dec. 11, 2015.

The quote goes some ways to explain the failure of Armenia opposition
parties to influence Armenia politics or to unseat the remarkably
successful, yet apparently unpopular, President Serge Sarkissian.

While some of the president's critics believe he has a choke-hold on
power because of his party's expertise in staging fraudulent
elections, the fact is there's more to Sarkissian's success than
electoral chicanery.

A crucial reason for the regime's unchallenged dominance is its access
to financial and human resources as well as the Republican Party's
organizational skills. Being the incumbent, Sarkissian also enjoys
predictable advantages. Meanwhile, the opposition is diffuse and weak.
The regime's strategy is simple: to stay in power. The opposition
story is  complicated: it has to go through loops, compromises, and
unwieldy alliances.

The shortcomings of the opposition are many.

During the two terms of the Sarkissian presidency, the opposition
failed to produce a single charismatic leader who could inspire the
populace and embody the drive for democracy. The politician who came
closest to be considered a credible alternative to Sarkissian was
Raffi Hovanissian of the Heritage Party, but following the disputed
results of the last elections, rather than lead his followers to force
a reversal of the results, he crumbled and rushed to Moscow presumably
to tell the Russians that he had been robbed. He returned
empty-handed. And when he met Sarkissian, his language and manners
were that of an apologetic teenager approaching the school principal.
He gravely disappointed his followers.

The opposition has relied too often on mass rallies as spark plugs for
regime change. At these public gatherings, usually in front of the
opera building, party leaders seemed to be inspired by the arias
reverberating from the interior of the building: they indulged in ad
hominem and in interminable coloratura orations for cheap applause.
The spectators--mostly senior citizens nostalgic for the Soviet
days--wanted change which would improve their standard of living. As
people who pine for the `good old days' of the Soviet system they are
not agents of change. After listening'for several hours--to harangues
and virtuoso demagoguery, they melted away to go home disappointed.

As in past occasions'in parliament or in public `the verbose
politicians at the opera rallies had failed to offer comprehensive
programs (social, economic, political and organizational) that could
have captured the imagination of the voters, particularly the
activists, intellectuals, students, labor, and progressive thinkers.
The rallies had become the aim rather than the means for change.

Other chinks in the opposition's armour: some `opposition' politicians
are oligarchs who have become pols so as to maintain their business
network and to protect their privileges. Versed in the accepted lingo,
they talk the talk but don't walk the talk. Raised under communism,
they have a notional familiarity with democracy. As well they see
themselves as entitled elite, like the Soviet nomenclatura, while the
citizenry is perceived as hoi polloi. That the politician is elected
to serve the public can be a bizarre idea in such an authoritarian
milieu.

Yet another opposition weakness: the opportunists among them are only
too eager to become silent partners to the regime so as to benefit
from Sarkissian's largess. The electorate, aware of the farce, is
distrustful of the rent-a-politician mob.

Some observers believe Echmiadzin's alliance with the ruling party and
the oligarchs has hurt the opposition. But that argument has an
opposite mirror image: while some people have voted for Sarkissian
because of his close ties to Echmiadzin, others could have voted for
the opposition for the same reason. Catholicos Karekin II's lifestyle
and management are no secret to the citizens of Armenia.

A glaring weakness of the opposition is that it's under-resourced and
has no depth. The only time an opposition leader (Gagik Dzaroukian)
dared to challenge Sarkissian the rebel oligarch's wealth was
threatened by unknown elements. Seeing he could lose his mini-empire,
Dzaroukian asked for peace with the obvious promise that he would not
make waves.

Twenty-five years after independence, the opposition parties remain
amateurish when it comes to organization matters. For example, there
has never been an election where the opposition was represented in all
or almost all polling stations. In the recent constitution referendum,
the anti-Sarkissian faction was represented in only 1,200 of the 2,000
polling stations.

The opposition is also hamstrung by the electorate's relative lack of
political sophistication. As well, far too many citizens believe
regime change could translate to revolution/chaos at a time when the
Azeris are making almost daily incursions into Armenian territory.

A political party requires an engaged electorate. The economic and
social hardships have demoralized the populace, driving away promising
people who could have contributed to the formation of a progressive
government.

Diaspora's indifference to the opposition has hurt the anti-Sarkissian
factions. There has been an absence of support from the Diaspora for
the opposition. As long as Armenia is safe and some progress is being
made, the Diaspora seems to forgive the regime's trespasses.

Finally, the elephant'or the bear'in the room: the road to Armenia's
presidency goes through the Kremlin. The opposition needs President
Putin's nod but as long as Sarkissian doesn't make rash overtures to
the West, Putin will not try to replace him.

Related to the above is Russia's dominance of Armenia and Armenia's
need for Russian protection against Azerbaijan and Turkey. The
electorate is cognizant of the fact that some opposition leaders are
anti-Russian. With storms swirling around the Transcaucasus and the
Middle East, the Armenian citizenry is in no mood for the so-called
color revolutions or an opposition takeover which could pit Russia
against Armenia.

Keghart.com....Jirair Tutunjian



Cartoons Worth a Thousand Words

 Jirair Tutunjian, Toronto, 30 January 2016
http://www.keghart.com/Tutunjian-Kasbarian-Perspectives

The centennial of the Armenian Genocide last year brought forth a welcome avalanche of political activism, books, scholarly and journalistic reports, conferences, community projects, music, theatrical performances, visual arts presentations, and civic and religious commemorations.
One such event was the multi-exhibition series “Kiss the Ground” (Yergurbakootyoon), which featuredPerspectives from Exile—22 political cartoons by author, journalist, activist, and cartoonist Lucine Kasbarian of New Jersey and Massachusetts.
Fourteen other Armenian-American creative people participated in the “Kiss the Ground” exhibition, which explored memory, loss and culture, and was held at the Cambridge School of Weston, Massachusetts.
An offshoot of the exhibition is Kasbarian's Perspectives from Exile—a 110-page illustrated volume that includes a foreword by Curator Todd Bartel, a visual arts teacher and the director of  the Cambridge School’s Thompson Gallery.
The volume’s incisive political cartoons explore topics such as Armenian Genocide denial, reparations, Turkish and Azeri belligerence and NATO indifference to the Armenian Cause.
Just one of Kasbarian’s cartoons produced during the Genocide centennial year, titled “Threaten the Pope,” spotlighted Erdogan dreaming about the fate of Pope Francis after Erdogan threatened the latter for acknowledging the Armenian Genocide. The cartoon depicts Erdogan recalling yesteryear’s attempt on the life of Pope John Paul II by Turkish citizen Mehmet Ali Agca.
Also included in Perspectives from Exile are an interview with Kasbarian conducted by Bartel, photos of the exhibition, highly informative articles by Kasbarian about the history and consequences of the Genocide and its denial, and the artist's statement.
Kasbarian's cartoons have appeared in more than twenty-five Armenian and non-Armenian publications and websites, including Foreign Policy JournalZartonkWomen's International PerspectiveMassis WeeklyVeterans Today and Keghart.com.
Kasbarian’s political cartoons reaffirm the validity of the opinion of many critics of “modern” Turkey that the rulers’ mindset has not changed from that of the Ottomans and the Young Turks.
In a year which saw Turkey's continued oppression of its indigenous minorities and journalists; its shooting down of a Russian military jet; Ankara's continued denial of the Armenian Genocide; its president's support of ISIS and aggression into Syria and Iraq, not to mention his numerous inane pronouncements, Kasbarian's Perspectives from Exile provides some much-needed relief from the oppressive insanity and criminality pouring out of Ankara.
This publication deserves wide distribution as it is undoubtedly a significant contribution to the published observances of the Centennial of the Armenian Genocide.
To order Perspectives from Exile ($24 USD), visit Lulu.com 
 or place an order with Armenian booksellers.
Threaten_the_Pope.jpgAuthor_Lucine_Kasbarian.JPG

Cartoons Worth a Thousand Words By Jirair Tutunjian for Keghart.com



The centennial of the Armenian Genocide last year brought forth a welcome avalanche of political activism, books, scholarly and journalistic reports, conferences, community projects, music, theatrical performances, visual arts presentations, and civic and religious commemorations. 

One such event was the multi-exhibition series “Kiss the Ground” (Yergurbakootyoon), which featured Perspectives from Exile22 political cartoons by author, journalist, activist, and cartoonist Lucine Kasbarian of New Jersey and Massachusetts.

Fourteen other Armenian-American creative people participated in the “Kiss the Ground” exhibition, which explored memory, loss and culture, and was held at the Cambridge School of Weston, Massachusetts.  

An offshoot of the exhibition is Kasbarian's Perspectives from Exile
a 110-page illustrated volume that includes a foreword by Curator Todd Bartel, a visual arts teacher and the director of  the Cambridge School’s Thompson Gallery.

The volume’s incisive political cartoons explore topics such as Armenian Genocide denial, reparations, Turkish and Azeri belligerence and NATO indifference to the Armenian Cause.

Just one of Kasbarian’s cartoons produced during the Genocide centennial year, titled “Threaten the Pope,” spotlighted Turkish President Erdogan dreaming about the fate of Pope Francis after Erdogan threatened the latter for acknowledging the Armenian Genocide. The cartoon depicts Erdogan recalling yesteryear’s attempt on the life of Pope John Paul II by Turkish citizen Mehmet Ali Agca.

Also included in Perspectives from Exile are an interview with Kasbarian conducted by Bartel, photos of the exhibition, highly informative articles by Kasbarian about the history and consequences of the Genocide and its denial, and the artist's statement.

Kasbarian's cartoons have appeared in more than twenty-five Armenian and non-Armenian publications and websites, including Foreign Policy Journal, Zartonk, Women's International Perspective, Massis Weekly, Veterans Today and Keghart.com.    

Kasbarian’s political cartoons reaffirm the validity of the opinion of many critics of “modern” Turkey that the rulers’ mindset has not changed from that of the Ottomans and the Young Turks.

In a year which saw Turkey's continued oppression of its indigenous minorities and journalists; its shooting down of a Russian military jet; Ankara's continued denial of the Armenian Genocide; its president's support of ISIS and aggression into Syria and Iraq, not to mention his numerous inane pronouncements, Kasbarian's Perspectives from Exile provides some much-needed relief from the oppressive insanity and criminality pouring out of Ankara.


This publication deserves wide distribution as it is undoubtedly a significant contribution to the published observances of the Centennial of the Armenian Genocide.

To order Perspectives from Exile ($24 USD), visit: 
http://www.lulu.com/shop/todd-bartel-and-lucine-kasbarian/lucine-kasbarianperspectives-from-exile/paperback/product-22477813.html  or place an order with Armenian booksellers.

Hratch Tchilingirian 15 hrs · London · «Մեր Նպատակն է Արեւմտահայերէնը Ապրող Մշակոյթ Դարձնել»


«Մեր Նպատակն է Արեւմտահայերէնը Ապրող Մշակոյթ Դարձնել»
Մեր Նպատակն է Արեւմտահայերէնը Ապրող Մշակոյթ Դարձնել. Հրաչ Չիլինկիրեան, «Հաւաքի հիմնական նպատակն էր արեւմտահայերէնը ոչ թէ միայն իբր լեզու…
AREVELK.AM|BY VIP STUDIO LLC

Saturday, 6 February 2016

Dr Dikran Abrahamian Keghart.com

Keghart.com Update 9/10

January 31, 2016


 
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Diffuse Opposition Sarkissian’s Best Weapon  Editorial
Գերմանիայի Դիրքորոշումը Ցեղասպանութեան Նկատմամբ
  Դոկտ. Ժիրայր Քոչարեան
Cartoons Worth a Thousand Words   Jirair Tutunjian
Regional Tensions Fracturing Russia's Alliances  Joshua Kucera
“Antranigian Story Defines Horrors in Keghi”  Tom Vartabedian
Canada's Response to the Armenian Genocide  Aram Adjemian
Պատմութիւնը՝ Որ Ինքզինք Կը Կրկնէ  Դոկտ. Հրայր ճէպէճեան
Being Armenian Now  Seta Barsoumian Dadoyan
The Silver Belt  George Bowater
Ո՞վ Պատասխան Պիտի Տայ Ոսկան Մխիթարեան
Oshagan, Father Kline and Literature  Serop Yeretzian
Translated by Vahe H. Apelian
Computer Related Education in Armenia  Areg Gharabegian
Առածը ...  Ահմէտ Ալթան, Հայացուց՝ Գրիգոր Կէօքճեան
Education, Backbone of Society
  Rick Salutin & Նաիրա Հայրումյան
 

Ras al-Khaimah founded by Armenians

Ras al-Khaimah was founded by Armenians, according to His Highness Sheikh Dr. Sultan bin Mohammed Al Qasimi, supreme council member and the Ruler of the Sharjah Emirate. Its original name was Julfar since it was founded by Armenians who had fled Persia during the Mongol invasion. The sheikh says Julfar is an Armenian name. The city is at the tip of Sharjah.
The Poll question is located on front page of the website in the right column

Is the Republic of Armenia providing adequate help to Syrian-Armenian refugees?

 
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Dr. Dikran Abrahamian · 15 Bridle Rd. · Penetanguishene, On L9M 1J5 · Canada

Armenian News...A Topalian... {The Vatican offers Ankara a fig leaf]



Global Post
Feb 4 2016
Turkey to send envoy back to Vatican after Armenia 'genocide' row

Turkey says it will send its ambassador back to the Vatican, after
recalling him last year in a row over Pope Francis' use of the word
"genocide" to describe the massacres of Armenians by Ottoman forces
during World War I.

The foreign ministry said Wednesday its decision came after the
Vatican published a statement welcoming Ankara's willingness -- first
expressed in 2005 -- to create a commission of Turkish and Armenian
historians to study the 1915 killings.

"In this context... the decision has been taken to send our ambassador
Mehmet Pacaci back to the Vatican," ministry spokesman Tanju Bilgic
said in a statement.

Turkey recalled its ambassador in April last year, days away from the
100th anniversary of what the pope described as "the first genocide of
the 20th century".

A furious Ankara accused the pope of a "selective overview" of World
War I and "ignoring the atrocities suffered by the Turkish and Muslim
peoples who lost their lives" in favour of concentrating on Christians
and above all Armenians.

Armenians say up to 1.5 million of their kin were killed between 1915
and 1917 as the Ottoman Empire was falling apart, and have long sought
to win international recognition of the massacres as genocide.

But Turkey rejects the claims, arguing that 300,000 to 500,000
Armenians and as many Turks died in civil strife when Armenians rose
up against their Ottoman rulers and sided with invading Russian
troops. 


RFE/RL Report 
Armenian Minister Justifies Monopolies
Sargis Harutyunyan ## Astghik Bedevian
03.02.2016


The existence of business monopolies is inevitable in a country like
Armenia and the authorities in Yerevan are therefore not seeking to
eliminate them, Economy Minister Karen Chshmaritian said on Wednesday.

"The government has not fought and will not fight against monopolies,"
he told a news conference. "Our legislation and policies are aimed
instead at tackling abuse of monopolist positions, price collusion and
other practices specified by the law."

"Should we not allow the emergence of monopolies? That's not 

possible in Armenia," insisted Chshmaritian.

Some lucrative forms of business in Armenia, notably imports of fuel
and foodstuffs, have long been controlled by large companies belonging
to government-linked individuals. Local and foreign economists say the
resulting lack of competition in those sectors translates into
disproportionately high prices and hampers faster economic growth.

A World Bank survey released in 2013 said that oligopolies control 
20 percent of economic activity in Armenia, making it the most
monopolized economy in the former Soviet Union. World Bank 
officials have repeatedly called on the Armenian government to 
create a level playing field for entrepreneurs in all sectors.

In particular, the existence of de facto monopolies is widely blamed
for the fact that the retail prices of gasoline in Armenia have
dropped by only about 20 percent since oil prices began rapidly
falling in summer 2014. The oil prices have tumbled more than
three-fold in the past 18 months.

Levon Zurabian, a leader of the opposition Armenian National Congress
(HAK), challenged the government to explain this huge price disparity
during a question-and-answer session in parliament on
Wednesday. "Because of this deliberate monopolization, the Armenian
economy is now choking," he said.

Deputy Prime Minister Vache Gabrielian told Zurabian that the
government has asked the State Commission on the Protection of
Economic Competition (SCPEC) to investigate the gasoline prices and
determine just how market-based they are now. The anti-trust body has
rarely slapped major fines on lucrative firms holding dominant
positions in their respective sectors.

Another opposition lawmaker, Nikol Pashinian, decried a monopoly on
sugar imports to Armenia that has long been enjoyed by Samvel
Aleksanian, one of the country's richest men affiliated with President
Serzh Sarkisian's Republican Party (HHK). Pashinian pointed to
"lingering rumors" that Aleksanian is massively evading taxes and that
Sarkisian has a "personal share" in the tycoon's revenues.

The chief of the government staff, Davit Harutiunian, brushed aside
the allegations, saying that Pashinian is only keen to score political
points with false statements.

Sarkisian reportedly defended the sugar monopoly when he met with
members of the Armenian community in the Czech Republic during a
September 2014 visit to Prague. "Do you want a dozen people to import
sugar to a small country?" the "Aravot" daily quoted the Armenian
president as saying. 


news.am 
Armenian MP of Turkey upsets Turkish nationalists
03.02.2016


Istanbul Armenian attorney Selina Ã-zuzun DoÄ?an, who is also an 
MP from the main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP) of 
Turkey, has quite disturbed Turkish nationalists.

DoÄ?an, who had recently visited the country's Diyarbakır city as
member of a CHP delegation, wrote about her impressions of the visit
on her Facebook account, where she wrote Diyarbakır also as
Tigranakert (Dikranagerd), the Armenian name of the city.

As a result, Turkish nationalists instructed the writing of articles
in various websites, and against Selina Ã-zuzun DoÄ?an's statement. 


arka.am 
Switzerland was largest foreign investor in Armenia in first 
nine months of 2015

YEREVAN, February 3. Switzerland was the largest foreign
investor in the Armenian economy in the first nine months of 2015,
economy minister Karen Chshmarityan said today.

Speaking at a news conference, he said the net inflow of foreign
investments in January-September 2015 amounted to $296.7 million,
exceeding the same period of the previous year by $80 million.

The minister specified that foreign direct investment in the first
nine months of 2015 totaled $262.2 million, an increase of $38 million
when compared to the first nine months of 2014.

In particular, Swiss investments in the first 9 months of 2015 grew by
$82.4 million to $93.5 million, investments from Germany upped by
$57.9 million to $62.3 million, investments from Luxembourg increased
by $44.5 million to $59 million, investments from Argentina rose by
$24 million to $41 million, investments from the United Arab Emirates
saw a zero growth totaling $21 million, investments from France grew
by $17.5 million to $20.5 million and investments from the US
increased by $16 million to $17.5 million.

Some $137.3 million of these investments were channeled into the
mining sector,  $78.1 million went to electricity, gas, steam and air
conditioning sectors, $64.3 million went to manufacturing industry,
$33.1 million were invested into wholesale and retail trade, $24
million went to information and communications sectors and $11 million
to agriculture . 


epress.am 
Hundreds of Yerevan Residents Sleep on Streets or City's 
Sole Homeless Shelter: Press
02.04.2016 


Haykakan Zhamanak daily newspaper reports that according to unofficial
data, the number of homeless people in Yerevan is around 400, 300 of
whom sleep on the streets of the city, and only 103 ` in a homeless
shelter.

Speaking to the daily, Shavarsh Khachatryan, the director of Yerevan's
sole homeless shelter, said that their establishment is able to take
in only a hundred people at a time. Besides, he added, there is still
no specific definition of who can be considered `homeless' in Armenia.

`Shelter is usually provided to those who apply to us themselves, as
well as those whom we get notified about or who are brought here by
ambulance or police,' the director said.

Khachatryan noted that their beneficiaries usually find themselves in
a state of homelessness due to difficult socioeconomic conditions, or
alcoholism: `Under the current procedure, shelter is provided for a
period of 3 months. During this time, the management tries to find
them jobs, or return those banished to their families.' 


news.am 
Armenia Parliament speaker and UK ambassador discuss 
one-sided PACE reports
04.02.2016

YEREVAN. ` President of the National Assembly (NA) of Armenia, Galust
Sahakyan, on Thursday received British Ambassador Judith Margaret
Farnworth.

The NA informed Armenian News-NEWS.am that the parliament speaker
stressed that the Armenia-UK political contacts have intensified and
cooperation achieved considerable progress in recent years. Sahakyan
expressed a conviction that Armenia looks toward expanding relations
with Great Britain.

In addition, the NA President touched upon the two resolutions on
Nagorno-Karabakh during the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of
Europe (PACE) Winter Session, and which, by his assessment, were
distorting the reality and inhibiting the peaceful negotiation process
over the Karabakh conflict, and misleading the international
community. Head of the Armenian parliament noted that the resolution,
entitled `Escalation of Violence in Nagorno-Karabakh and Other
Occupied Territories of Azerbaijan,' by British former MP Robert
Walter, was not adopted due to the PACE MPs who voted for justice.
`That resolution contained a serious risk, as it was an inadmissible
attempt by Azerbaijan and its co-thinkers to move the settlement of
the Karabakh problem to parallel platforms,' said Sahakyan. The
speaker of parliament noted that Armenia continues remaining adherent
to the ongoing negotiating process under the auspices of the OSCE
Minsk Group co-chairs, which is the only internationally recognized
platform of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict settlement.

Ambassador Farnworth, for her part, also emphasized the development of
the bilateral relations in several domains.

In the course of the meeting the sides touched upon the process of the
constitutional reforms. In this connection, the UK ambassador welcomed
the decision of the Armenian authorities to switch to a parliamentary
system of governance.

And regarding Robert Walter's anti-Armenian report, Judith Margaret
Farnworth noted that an individual's report does not reflect the
policy of the government, and added that Great Britain supports a
peaceful settlement of the Nagorno-Karabakh problem.

On January 26, PACE voted against MP Robert Walter's (UK) one-sided
report entitled `Escalation of Violence in Nagorno-Karabakh and Other
Occupied Territories of Azerbaijan,' but adopted MP Milica MarkoviÄ?'s
(Bosnia and Herzegovina) one-sided report about Sarsang Reservoir in
Nagorno-Karabakh, and entitled `Inhabitants of frontier regions of
Azerbaijan are deliberately deprived of water.' 


arka.am 
Armenia's national football team drops two points in FIFA's 
ranking

YEREVAN, February 4. Armenia's national football team fell two
points in FIFA's world ranking to the 123rd position between Belize
and Ethiopia.

In their latest official games Armenian team suffered two major
defeats ` it lost 0:4 friendly match to France and 0:3 to Albania in
the European Championship qualifying game.

Armenia's rivals in 2018 World Cup qualifiers are Romania (16th),
Poland (34th), Denmark (40th), Montenegro (84th) and Kazakhstan
(131st).

The best ten teams in FIFA world rankings published Thursday are
Belgium, followed by Argentina, Spain, Germany, Chile, Brazil,
Portugal, Colombia, England and Austria. 


Evening Star, UK
February 3, 2016 Wednesday
Church celebrates centenary of its building with special service
Vince Yallop


Members of a Felixstowe church have celebrated 100 years of Christian
worship on the site of their building.

The original foundation stone of Bethesda Baptist Church in Cavendish
Road was laid in 1915 by the first pastor, FRW Heath.

A century later, more than 100 members and visitors enjoyed a
memorable day, poring over old photographs, the original church minute
book, and even the engraved trowel presented when the church was first
built.

André Beck, now Bethesda's 10th minister, said: "A healthy church is
one which does not boast, because we are not any more special or
clever or good than anyone else at all, but all we do is hold onto
God, who has proved his faithfulness to us as a church over the last
hundred years.

"And so we want to keep preaching faithfully that God's son, Jesus
Christ, died on the cross, to take on himself all that we have done
wrong, and to give us all that he did perfectly right.

"We need to tell this good news in a way that people  ¨can still
understand today,  ¨but never changing that message."

Hymns and children's songs which would have been sung in 1915 were
enjoyed in the building, which has recently been extended and
modernised, during a celebration service followed by lunch.

Built during the First World War, the church survived the 1939-45
conflict, as well as the devastating floods of 1953.

In memory of the tragic Armenian genocide that took place 
in the same year as Bethesda's foundation, 1915, the church 
members offered a gift to Armenian Ministries in that 
poverty-stricken land.